The USD 435 Board of Education accepted a donation of $5,000 from the Jeffcoat Memorial Foundation to purchase new books for the Abilene High School career center.

Hank Royer, who oversees the Jeffcoat Foundation, addressed the board before members accepted the donated funds.

Royer spoke about his own time at AHS. He recalled being required to write a term paper where he discussed what he wanted to do with his career and struggling to find information about possible future careers.

“There just wasn’t much material available,” Royer said.

He finally decided he wanted to be a lawyer.

“Everybody in my family’s a lawyer or a doctor, so I chose lawyer just because I knew something about it,” Royer said. “No that I was particularly interested in it — but it worked out and I’m here. Bill Jeffcoat didn’t want to be a photographer. But as life worked out he ended up coming back to Abilene, working for his dad in the photography shop and that’s what he did. But I think there’s a full range of opportunities for young people out there. But they need to know about them and if you don’t have the materials — there wasn’t much when I was there — if you don’t have the materials, they don’t know about them. A lot of the kids don’t know you don’t have to spend four years and three to five years in graduate school to get a good job. There are really good positions out there. You can go from high school right into a technical school or into a training job. The only way they’re going to learn about that is to have the materials available.”

According to Royer, the average publication date of materials in the AHS career center is 2006.

“The average date of the books you have is 15 years old, up at the high school,” he said. “Those jobs don’t even exist, a lot of them that were in (those materials) and the new ones certainly aren’t in there.”

Royer said AHS Media Specialist Kim Townsend had approached him about the need for updated career materials.

“Hopefully some kids will get some real good use out of them,” Royer said of the materials the funds would be used to purchase. “If only one person finds a career path, it will be worth the $5,000 — I guarantee you.”

The USD 435 Board of Education accepted a donation of $5,000 from the Jeffcoat Memorial Foundation to purchase new books for the Abilene High School career center.

Hank Royer, who oversees the Jeffcoat Foundation, addressed the board before members accepted the donated funds.

Royer spoke about his own time at AHS. He recalled being required to write a term paper where he discussed what he wanted to do with his career and struggling to find information about possible future careers.

“There just wasn’t much material available,” Royer said.

He finally decided he wanted to be a lawyer.

“Everybody in my family’s a lawyer or a doctor, so I chose lawyer just because I knew something about it,” Royer said. “No that I was particularly interested in it — but it worked out and I’m here. Bill Jeffcoat didn’t want to be a photographer. But as life worked out he ended up coming back to Abilene, working for his dad in the photography shop and that’s what he did. But I think there’s a full range of opportunities for young people out there. But they need to know about them and if you don’t have the materials — there wasn’t much when I was there — if you don’t have the materials, they don’t know about them. A lot of the kids don’t know you don’t have to spend four years and three to five years in graduate school to get a good job. There are really good positions out there. You can go from high school right into a technical school or into a training job. The only way they’re going to learn about that is to have the materials available.”

According to Royer, the average publication date of materials in the AHS career center is 2006.

“The average date of the books you have is 15 years old, up at the high school,” he said. “Those jobs don’t even exist, a lot of them that were in (those materials) and the new ones certainly aren’t in there.”

Royer said AHS Media Specialist Kim Townsend had approached him about the need for updated career materials.

“Hopefully some kids will get some real good use out of them,” Royer said of the materials the funds would be used to purchase. “If only one person finds a career path, it will be worth the $5,000 — I guarantee you.”

 

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